Sam ThorneSchool: A Recent History of Self-Organized Art Education

Sam Thorne’s School: A Recent History of Self-Organized Art Education is a chronicle of self-organized art schools and artist-run education platforms that have emerged since 2000. Comprising a series of twenty conversations conducted by Thorne with the artists, curators, and educators behind these schools, the book maps a territory at once fertile and contested. Spanning projects in London, Lagos, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Ramallah, Berlin, and Saint Petersburg, among other locations, these critical dialogues respond to spiraling student debt, the MFA system, and the “pedagogical turn,” while offering proposals for the future of art education.



Charlotte BirnbaumBon! Bon!
On the Charms of Sweet Cuisine
On the Table V


People have used honey, dates, and fruits to sweeten their dishes since time immemorial, but with the introduction of sugar—“white gold”—into cooking and baking, a whole array of delightful flavors and culinary possibilities was unearthed. Sugar was the building block for edible sculptures and model palaces made for festivals and celebrations thousands of years ago, and the main ingredient in lavish creations for Rococo and Baroque banquets. In Bon! Bon!, Charlotte Birnbaum uncovers the wonderful world of all things sugary through surprising anecdotes and historical accounts, each accompanied by delectable recipes that are sure to satisfy any sweet tooth.



Michael TedjaThe Holarium: Negeren Series 818:32

Unlike a number of artists who have begun to use negation, detachment, and inaccessibility as tools to reflect upon and problematize the narratives mapped onto them as members of diasporic or immigrant communities, Michael Tedja plays the other extreme. His work seems to exceed and absorb the institutions that attempt to codify him one way or another, like self-proliferating grey goo. Whereas his peers may seek to transcend identity as such, Tedja’s practice is hypersubjective and all-encompassing.



Atelier Bow-Wow with K. Michael HaysArchitectural Ethnography

In this in-depth conversation with architectural theorist K. Michael Hays, Yoshi Tsukamoto and Momoyo Kaijima of Atelier Bow-Wow reflect on representation, occupation, and the democracy of architecture. They unfold their concept of an “ecology of livelihood,” wherein shadowless figures, objects, and spaces coexist with construction details. Explaining their belief in the behavioral capacities of humans, architecture, and nature, Tsukamoto and Kaijima reveal the generous spirit of their work, and the importance of pushing such capacities to their most yielding limits.